Check if you need to wait for probate

Manage Accounts

Certain assets or accounts will become a part of the probate estate.

If assets or debts of the estate are connected to an account, you may need to wait before taking action, so document information about these.

Bills that solely affected the deceased can be closed, such as a cell phone bill.

If you have further questions about what to do with them in the interim, consider hiring a probate lawyer to help with that process.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information about what items typically fall into the probate estate, review the task “Pay the estate’s bills, taxes, and debts.”

Helpful Tips


  • Mortgage
  • Car payments
  • Insurance payments
  • Home utilities
  • Real estate and property taxes
  • Credit card payments
  • Income taxes

Personal Considerations


Did the deceased have debts?


Accounts associated with these debts should be handled as part of the probate process.

These accounts should not be closed by anyone except the executor or administrator of the estate.

The debts will usually become the responsibility of the deceased's estate.

This means you should not pay these debts out of personal funds.

Consult with the executor of the estate so that these debts can be handled in accordance with probate procedures.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information on paying the deceased's bills and debts as part of the probate process, see the "Pay the estate's bills, debts, and taxes" section of the Guide.


You should first confirm that this is in fact the case since most people die with some form of debt.

Even if you can find now evidence of the deceased owing money, creditors will be given the opportunity to make claims for debts against the deceased's estate as part of the probate process.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information on notifying creditors of a death, see the "Notify creditors that probate has been authorized by the probate court" section of the Guide.


If the deceased had debts:

Accounts associated with these debts should be handled as part of the probate process.

These accounts should not be closed by anyone except the executor or administrator of the estate.

The debts will usually become the responsibility of the deceased's estate.

This means you should not pay these debts out of personal funds.

Consult with the executor of the estate so that these debts can be handled in accordance with probate procedures.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information on paying the deceased's bills and debts as part of the probate process, see the "Pay the estate's bills, debts, and taxes" section of the Guide.

If the deceased did not have debts:

You should first confirm that this is in fact the case since most people die with some form of debt.

Even if you can find now evidence of the deceased owing money, creditors will be given the opportunity to make claims for debts against the deceased's estate as part of the probate process.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information on notifying creditors of a death, see the "Notify creditors that probate has been authorized by the probate court" section of the Guide.


Have you opened an estate bank account?


Pay outstanding debts of the estate with funds held in this bank account.

Centralize estate assets into this accounts per the probate procedures in your state and county.

If you have already opened an estate bank account, you are likely ready to close estate accounts.


And you are the executor or administrator of the estate, you should do so as part of the probate process.

It may be too early to close certain accounts like credit cards, bank accounts, and other important assets of the deceased.

Pay estate debts out of and centralize all estate assets into the estate bank account.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information on opening an estate bank account, see the "Open an estate bank account" section of the Guide.


If you have opened an estate bank account:

Pay outstanding debts of the estate with funds held in this bank account.

Centralize estate assets into this accounts per the probate procedures in your state and county.

If you have already opened an estate bank account, you are likely ready to close estate accounts.

If you have not opened an estate bank account:

And you are the executor or administrator of the estate, you should do so as part of the probate process.

It may be too early to close certain accounts like credit cards, bank accounts, and other important assets of the deceased.

Pay estate debts out of and centralize all estate assets into the estate bank account.

Guides_Icon.svgRead More For more information on opening an estate bank account, see the "Open an estate bank account" section of the Guide.

Providers to Contact


Probate Attorneys Near You

Probate attorneys can advise you of the rules and procedures for closing the deceased’s accounts. They help settle a deceased person’s estate.

No results in your area.


Manage Accounts